Monday, April 23, 2007

It came from the UK

Here's another one for you, ten more from artists across the pond.
If you like what you hear, please follow the links to support these artists.

*For some odd reason the play-tagger is acting up in this entry, still playing some of the songs at a much faster pace than it should be. The only reasonable explaination for this is an alien spacecraft disturbance or something, because I've checked everything and still found no answer. If a song sounds like an Alvin & The Chipmunks cover, just open the mp3 in a new window to hear how it should sound. If any of you have experienced this problem before and know a solution, please fill me in...


The first track I chose is from the Bees, (known as A Band of Bees in the U.S.,) and "Who Cares What The Question Is?" is the opening track on their new album Octopus that I mentioned back in February. The Bees have given us three albums in this decade, most noteably their 2002 debut Sunshine Hit Me, which was nominated for the Mercury Prize alongside the likes of Doves and David Bowie. I love the guitar work on this one...


From the MySpace: "The Moths (a West London trio) are an electro-punk sensation waiting to happen. Already over the past few months the handful of live shows played by The Moths have had hearts a'fluttering across the capital. Eschewing the dull-eared bravado of the nascent Lad Rock scene The Moths proffer love, arrogance, poetry, some cracking drum machine rhythms and a frontman who has been drawing creditable comparisons to everyone from Pete Shelley to Marc Almond via Brett Anderson. Crucially they also provide corking tunes – three of which have made it onto this, their debut single – and the sort of heartfelt paeans to emotional pain which could make Moths cheerleaders of us all."


From the Official Site: "THE BISHOPS are a rock and roll band emanating from London. They are fronted by twins Mike Bishop (vocals, guitar) and Pete Bishop (vocals, bass) and completed by Scotsman Chris McConville (drums). From the dark damp cellars of their youth hostel abode, the band worked tirelessly towards creating their sound, studiously developing their gift for classic song craft. The result of these sessions was a collection of songs that are refreshingly striking and different.

The bands musical influences stem from a range of genres: but to list them isn't what it's about. Their sound does features an amalgamation of ideas but it's their reinterpretation of this sound that makes THE BISHOPS so thoroughly relevant, drawing upon a range of classic influences whilst still creating something new, original and exciting."


From the Official Site: "In a music scene splintered into so many subgenres that it's barely recognisable from its original blueprint, a band with the courage to stand up for rock'n'roll's fundamentals is a breath of fresh air. Meet Bobby Anderson, rock'n'soul savant and pint-sized powerhouse singer and guitarist in Fortune Drive. He feels strongly about this sort of thing.

"That's a problem at the moment," he seethes. "There aren't any rock'n'roll bands. It's all post-punk, art-rock electro, new rave whatever. We just like rock'n'roll bands and that's what we're trying to aspire to be." Four years ago, Bobby reunited scattered schoolfriends Alan Akehurst (guitar), Andy Lowe (bass), Ingo Nyakairu (keyboards) and Mark Bent (drums) back to Bristol. And it's been the dark-hearted classics -The Doors, The Who, Oasis - that have given Fortune Drive their reason for being."


From Rough Trade: "Jack Penate seems destined for big things this year - his pop sensibilities and remarkable song craft have already got him noticed - his energetic gigs are always rammed, his myspace page is among the most visited on there and, most recently, he's cropped up in virtually everybody's ones to watch in 2007 poll." If you've been keeping a close eye on this page you'll recall that I said a few good things about Jack Penate after catching his showcase at SXSW. Jack's first single "Second, Minute or Hour" was released late-last year and sold out in one morning, and he performed that one last week on Zane Lowe's BBC 1 radio show...


From Monsters and Critics: "Favourite Worst Nightmare' is described as everything you hoped Arctic Monkeys would do next. Not so much a sequel as an upgrade, a breakneck techni-color journey through screwball punk and guitar-fuelled dance floor heroics. The album is also described as very, very fast and very, very loud. A “brilliant” racket that proves there's infinitely more to Arctic Monkeys than writing pretty little ditties. Yet at the same time boasting some of the strongest songs they've ever written." Songs from the new Arctic Monkeys album Favourite Worst Nightmare have been clogging up the Hype Machine since the moment it first leaked. So here's one you might not have heard, a "very, very fast and very, very loud" single that is featured on the Japanese import of the album.


Amy Winehouse is from North London. The Rumble Strips are a sax and trumpet wielding rock quartet from Devon, way down in the south west corner of England. They recently teamed up to put out a split 7'', with the Rumble Strips laying down their own version of "Back To Black" on one side, and on the opposite side a remix of the same song. The remix is basically the Rumble Strips' cover version from Side A, added in with Amy Winehouse's soulful singing. The result is a good one, with the horns really pushing this song forward.


We might as well continue on with the soul theme from the first song, this time with another British female soul singer. Her name is Alice Russell and she's been on the scene since releasing a debut solo album titled Under The Munka Moon in 2004. Below Alice Russell brings her "signature sound of funk and fun to the lush 70's-esque orchestration of "High Up on the Hook," from the recent release of A New Groove, another album in the long list of releases from the Putumayo World Music record label.


Switches are an indie rock band who released their debut EP just last year and put themselves on the map with their single "Lay Down the Law." After playing two Carling Festival dates the band put out another single, got signed to Atlantic, and released their debut album today (4/23). You won't find the song below on the new album though, "Cut My Hair" was a B-side on one of their earlier 7'' releases.


The Strange Death Of Liberal England is the name of a book published in 1935 that "attempted to explain the decline of the British Liberal Party in the years 1910 to 1914." Wow, that sounds fun. The Strange Death Of Liberal England (TSDOLE) is also a five-piece band from Portsmouth who have just released their debut single on the London based independent label Fantastic Plastic Records. The band got off to a quick start in 2006 by winning the Drowned in Sound's readers' choice award, and someone out there was impressed enough by their sound to book TSDOLE on a handful of dates supporting of Montreal next month.

8 comments:

scott said...

Couldn't get the arctic monkeys or amy winehouse to work properly.

Mr. Curiosity said...

Sorry, working out the bugs here...

Alexander said...

Do you have the Arctic Monkeys bonus track 'Matador'?

Mr. Curiosity said...

I heard Matador (don't own it,) but I found Frame to be the stronger tune of the two Japanese bonus tracks.

Marc said...

Whoa is anyone else only able to hear high-speed chipmonk versions of all these songs?

Mr. Curiosity said...

Please see top of entry.

tthorn said...

Always love these entries. I'd also suggest checking out new single "It Will Find You" by Maps, which sounds like a hybrid of Mew and Junior Boys (seriously).

Mr. Curiosity said...

Thanks Tom, I'll have to check out that track you recommended.