Sunday, December 07, 2008

Like a Box of Chocolates

A while back I described Covert as "an mp3 blog covering whatever I happen to be listening to at the moment," and that is pretty much always the case. I like to try out just about any kind of music to see what sticks, any never stay true to any one genre for too long.

When I find a song, album, or artist that sounds interesting, I always put it in a separate folder for future use. Here are a few random tracks from that folder, with handy links provided should you want to get more.

Broadcast is a two-piece English band who have been creating dreamy pop by mixing 60's-inspired vocals and intricate electric sounds since 1995. The Future Crayon is a collection of Broadcast B-sides and rarities recorded between 2000 and 2003. There are a bunch of nice tracks on the album, making it great starting point for new fans. Balmorhea is an instrumental project based in Austin who make beautifully minimalistic post rock with acoustic guitar, piano, violin, cello, and bass. Check Foxy Digitalis, Austin Sound, and Pfork for reviews.
Slaraffenland is a five-piece band from Denmark whose soundscapes are built with guitars, electronics, brass, woodwinds, strings, hand claps, and a dash of free improvisation. Featured at Hometapes, Mix Tapes, and Pfork.
Hush Arbors is Virginia folk-rock musician Keith Wood, who is part of the recent freak-folk boom that includes artists like Six Organs of Admittance and Voice of the Seven Woods. His self-titled debut "combines the pensive songwriting of John Phillips circa Wolfking, the plaintive honesty of Neil Young, and the fishtank-gazing cacophony of Six Organs of Admittance. Wood writes classic-sounding songs that sound readymade for AM radio, circa 1968."
I told you previously about both Trans Am and The Fucking Champs, and when they combine forces their nom de plume is, naturally, The Fucking Am. If you're into epic Thin Lizzy-esque guitar duels, this is the band for you. Chicago's Drag City record label can tell you all about them.

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